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Protecting Children From Porn



If you’ve seen the news lately, you’ve likely seen stories about PornHub withdrawing access to their site in certain states.


This is a good thing.


The reason they are retaliating is because states are enacting laws that essentially block kids from accidently accessing their site or the laws require age verification to see “adult content”.


That seems completely reasonable. Why wouldn’t PornHub support that? Adults can still see their content.


They won’t say it, but we all know why.


The younger a person sees pornography, the more likely they will be a lifelong user. They want to create young users who will later be adult addicts.

This is an evil and debased industry, who does not care at all about the devastating ramifications that porn is having in our country.


Let me give you a real-life example.


“Our 13-year-old son looks at PornHub a lot, but my husband doesn’t think it’s related to any of this.”


The disconnect is real.


I sat with a distraught mom whose 4-year-old daughter had a given a horrifying and very clear disclosure of sexual abuse by her 13-year-old brother.


And as we talked, the mom believed her daughter. Her husband did not. In fact, his theory was that the 4-year-old saw porn on the 13-year old’s phone (which he thought was totally harmless for him to be habitually consuming) and made up the disclosure.

I understand the denial, but let’s step into reality for a second.


What is more plausible? A 4-year-old seeing porn and then accusing someone of sexual abuse, when their brains can’t think in abstract terms, or a 13-year-old who has been habitually looking at porn for years, then acting out what he is seeing on his sibling?

I gently talked to the mom about this reality, but I understand it’s a gut-wrenching position for her to be in.


As PornHub throws a fit about age verification in several states, this is why it’s so important that these laws are enacted. When children are exposed to pornography the ramifications are massive.


Not every kid who sees porn will sexually abuse someone, but pornography exposure is known to harm relationships, rewire the brain, normalize sexual violence, and much, much more.


Small steps that we can take to protect kids are:

  1. Talk to them about the dangers they may face online, including pornography exposure

  2. Encourage law makers to pass laws that protect kids from the porn industry

  3. Have open and honest conversations as adults, including getting help if you struggle with porn use

If you want more information or training around the dangers or pornography and it’s link to sex trafficking, contact REHOPE University.

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